We believe that the world and its people are the created handiwork of God.  We were created to honour him and our calling is to be his agents in renewing a world broken by disobedience and suffering.

In History, students become aware of human cultural formation over time so that they may better understand our responsibility and potential as people in bringing shalom to all the various facets of human activity.

In Civics students explore the biblical bases for community and leadership and how they as individuals can contribute to the well-being of all as citizens of Canada, but also, of the Kingdom of God.

In Law students learn that law is a gift from God which frees us as people to “do justice”.  The course is a study of the structure of Canada’s legal system, including criminal law, civil law and human rights.

In Geography students recognize the earth as God’s creation.  Its structure and composition are examined and, in response to our calling as stewards of the creation, principles of sustainability and resource management are considered.

In Economics students study how people, organized as businesses, are to manage all resources in obedience to God’s call to sustainable and cultural development.  Understanding economics is a key to understanding business, government policy-making, international trade, and third-world development.

Course Title Course Details Grade
Civics and Citizenship - CHV 20 This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them. God created humans to live in community with Himself, each other and the creation. He established a covenant with humanity based on the words of the prophet Micah; “He has showed you, O man, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” To that end, we have governments, we elect people to represent us, to act justly, love mercy and walk humbly before God and their neighbour. The Civics and Citizenship course establishes a biblical basis for community and leadership which takes the form of government and calls individuals to live as Kingdom citizens, to understand and see justice done, to live in meaningful and dignified relationships and to recognize the beauty in each person and in the institutions which provide us with freedom, stability and peace. Prerequisite: None 10
Analysing Current Economic Issues - CIA 4U This course examines current national and global economic trends and policies from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the impact of choices that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in responding to local, national, and global economic issues such as globalization and global economic inequalities, trade agreements, national debt, taxation, social spending, and consumer debt. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, including economic models, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, current economic issues and to help them make reasoned economic decisions. Additional topics include the implications of the Greek term “oikonomia”, conservation, stewardship, justice and other Christian teachings. The LDCSS curriculum threads of relationships, citizenship, beauty and justice are woven throughout this course. Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities 12
Issues in Canadian Geography - CGC 1D/P This course examines interrelationships within and between Canada’s natural and human systems and how these systems interconnect with those in other parts of the world. Students will explore environmental, economic, and social geographic issues relating to topics such as transportation options, energy choices, and urban development. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate various geographic issues and to develop possible approaches for making Canada a more sustainable place in which to live. Prerequisite: None 9
Forces of Nature: Physical Processes and Disasters - CGF 3M This course examines Earth’s physical patterns and processes and how they create natural disasters and can contribute to human disasters. Students will explore how physical processes related to Earth’s water, land, and air, as well as interactions between these systems, can affect the planet and its people. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate Earth’s natural processes, to make predictions related to natural disasters, and to create plans to prepare for and/or respond to them. Prerequisite: Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9, Academic or Applied 11
The Environment and Resource Management - CGR 4M This course explores interactions between the natural and human environment, with a particular focus on the impact of human activity on various ecosystems. Students will explore resource management and sustainability practices, as well as related government policy and international protocols. Applying the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, students will investigate the relationship between people and the natural environment and will propose approaches for developing more sustainable relationships, including environmentally responsible actions that support stewardship. Prerequisite: Any university, university/college, or college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities 12
World Issues: A Geographic Analysis - CGW 4U This course looks at the global challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Students will explore a range of issues involving environmental, economic, social, and geopolitical interrelationships, and will examine governmental policies related to these issues. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues, including their impact on natural and human communities around the world. Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities 12
Canadian History Since World War I - CHC 2D/P This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914. Prerequisite: None 10
World History to the End of the 15th Century - CHW 3M This course explores the history of various societies around the world, from earliest times to around 1500 CE. Students will examine life in and the legacy of various ancient and pre-modern societies throughout the world, including those in, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating social, political, and economic structures and historical forces at work in various societies and in different historical eras. Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied 11
World History since the 15th Century - CHY 4C This course explores key developments and events in world history since approximately 1450, with a focus on interactions within and between various regions. Students will examine social, economic, and political developments and how they have affected different peoples. Students will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key turning points in world history and historical forces that have shaped our world. Prerequisite: Any university, university/college, or college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities 11
World History since the 15th Century - CHY 4U This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and assess societal progress or decline in world history. Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities. 11
Understanding Canadian Law - CLU 3M This course explores Canadian law, with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to the lives of people in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of rights and freedoms in Canada, our legal system, and family, contract, employment, tort, and criminal law. Students will use case studies and apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal inquiry process to develop legal reasoning skills and to formulate and communicate informed interpretations of legal issues, and they will develop the ability to advocate for new laws. As Christians we are called to serve God in every area of life, including law. We recognize that, given the brokenness of our relationship to each other because of the fall into sin, the law is a gift from God which frees us as humans to attempt to live in harmony with each other. In this course we will study various aspects of the Canadian legal system, its history, its structure, and of course, the law itself. We will wrestle with the concept of justice, how our society’s sense of justice and God’s sense of justice are distinct and how they are similar. Prerequisite: Canadian History since World War I, Grade 10, Academic or Applied 11